Baader-Meinhof and the Novel: Narratives of the Nation / by Julian Preece (auth.)

By Julian Preece (auth.)

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Additional info for Baader-Meinhof and the Novel: Narratives of the Nation / Fantasies of the Revolution, 1970–2010

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The process shows some of the hallmarks of trauma: Before you remember, you have to forget. The introduction / 5 past is repeated in the medium of literature in part because the events were not properly concluded, worked through, or discussed at the time. The cause of the trauma was enacted in 1977, in particular the murder of Hanns-Martin Schleyer. For a number of years after 1977, representing terrorism became taboo. Even today, Schleyer himself never features directly as a fictional character, despite writers’ fascination with him.

Gillian Becker, in Hitler’s Children, turns it against her and her fellow undergraduates, quoting a passage that shows Haller revealing the causes of his latent anarchism, which is one aspect of his contradictory character. She explains that Hesse was a pacifist, whose romanticism particularly appealed to [Meinhof and her friends], warming their feelings, who were already emotionally in heat. He wrote about individuals who were different from (better than) most people [ . . ] Steppenwolf, who is a “genius of suffering,” and who despises those who do not suffer, who are bourgeois—which is to say smug, vulgar, little, brash, insensitive, American, ordinary, dull, lukewarm, or engaged in the bakery business.

She explains that Hesse was a pacifist, whose romanticism particularly appealed to [Meinhof and her friends], warming their feelings, who were already emotionally in heat. He wrote about individuals who were different from (better than) most people [ . . ] Steppenwolf, who is a “genius of suffering,” and who despises those who do not suffer, who are bourgeois—which is to say smug, vulgar, little, brash, insensitive, American, ordinary, dull, lukewarm, or engaged in the bakery business. 44 At the end of Steppenwolf, Harry is introduced to the “Magic Theatre,” which is a performance of his own soul, a voyage into the recesses of his mind and personality.

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